If you have received (or receive in the future) a phone call, visit, or letter from a pipeline representative (including from Coates Field Service), we recommend that you inform yourself before signing anything or agreeing to allow your property to be surveyed. The Mountain Valley Pipeline (MVP) has NOT been approved yet and is in the early stages of review.

Even if you have already given permission to survey, you can still oppose the pipeline coming through your property. Many landowners did not know that they could say ‘no’ to the surveyors’ request – and did not realize how large this interstate pipeline would be.

 

If you have received (or receive in the future) a phone call, visit, or letter from a pipeline representative (including from Coates Field Service), we recommend that you inform yourself before signing anything or agreeing to allow your property to be surveyed. The Mountain Valley Pipeline (MVP) has NOT been approved yet and is in the early stages of review.

 

Even if you have already given permission to survey, you can still oppose the pipeline coming through your property. Many landowners did not know that they could say ‘no’ to the surveyors’ request – and did not realize how large this interstate pipeline would be.

 

The Mid-Atlantic Responsible Energy (MARE) Project has information about the legal rights of landowners on their website, including this page for property owners:

http://www.mareproject.org/property-owners/

 

5 things to do as a pipeline corridor landowner:

·      Contact a lawyer. [give resources for free or no-cost environmental lawyer resources]

·      Make an impact survey of your property. Do this yourself, or ask someone from the [Department of Natural Resources (DNR) or WVU Extension (esp. if you are farming)] to help you make an environmental ‘audit’ of your property and how it might be affected by having a pipeline of this scale installed.

·      Communicate with FERC.  Send FERC a letter that outlines your concerns. Doing an impact survey of your own first may give you some very specific reasons to include in your letter. A lawyer can help you with this letter. Or, if you would like non-legal help, let us know and we can put you in touch with a community volunteer. [last sentence ok?]

·      Talk with other landowners along the proposed pipeline corridor. If you are concerned about the impact of the pipeline and want to connect with other corridor landowners in Monroe County, talk with your neighbors, or call [Steve Miller at xxx or Jim Gore at xxx]

·      Get informed and attend the Public Meeting (date) and EQT Open House (date, location) with questions to ask.

 

All of the other Action suggestions apply to you, as well – especially contacting your county, state and federal officials. Again, if you would like any assistance, please let us know and we will arrange for a community volunteer to help.

The Mid-Atlantic Responsible Energy (MARE) Project has information about the legal rights of landowners on their website, including this page for property owners:

http://www.mareproject.org/property-owners/

 

5 things to do as a pipeline corridor landowner:

  • Contact a lawyer. [give resources for free or no-cost environmental lawyer resources]
  • Make an impact survey of your property. Do this yourself, or ask someone from the [Department of Natural Resources (DNR) or WVU Extension (esp. if you are farming)] to help you make an environmental ‘audit’ of your property and how it might be affected by having a pipeline of this scale installed.
  • Communicate with FERC. Send FERC a letter that outlines your concerns. Doing an impact survey of your own first may give you some very specific reasons to include in your letter. A lawyer can help you with this letter. Or, if you would like non-legal help, let us know and we can put you in touch with a community volunteer. [last sentence ok?]
  • Talk with other landowners along the proposed pipeline corridor. If you are concerned about the impact of the pipeline and want to connect with other corridor landowners in Monroe County, talk with your neighbors, or call [Steve Miller at xxx or Jim Gore at xxx]
  • Get informed and attend the Public Meeting (date) and EQT Open House (date, location) with questions to ask.

 

All of the other Action suggestions apply to you, as well – especially contacting your county, state and federal officials. Again, if you would like any assistance, please let us know and we will arrange for a community volunteer to help.